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Tag Archives: Angkor

Angkor IV: The life of a Khmer guy

We found our tuk-tuk driver (or rather he found us) at the famous Pub street during our first evening in Siem Reap. He was one of three drivers that approached us as we were coming out of a restaurant where we’d just had a “traditional Khmer dinner”.

The other two guys were older and could only say a couple of words in English. He was much younger, say 22-23-years old, and his English was above average. While it was obvious that he really wanted customers badly (there are thousands of tuk-tuk drivers in Siem Reap and in low season they struggle to find enough customers), he tried to not be pushy. I immediately liked him and asked Kara, my U.S. companion, whether she minded hiring him as our driver to Angkor on the next day. She did not object.

Siem Reap tuk-tuks are generally of the style of motorcycle and trailer.
Siem Reap tuk-tuks are generally of the style of motorcycle and trailer.

Courtesy: wikipedia.org
(note: the guy on the picture is not our guy, but similar age)

    The guy turned out to be 27 (by the end of our stay in Cambodia I began to suspect that Khmer people often look younger to the European than they actually were), yet he was not married yet. Just like the Khmer girl of my previous post did, he too went to English classes at some private school – and had to pay. He constructed his sentences in English with great care. Also, when trying to say something he often consulted a small Khmer – English phrasebook that he always held.

When we stopped at the Bayon temple at Angkor Thom, he took out another “book” that comprised of A4-sized sheets – photocopied and bundled together – to read while he waited for us. We asked him what it was. He said that he studied the book in order to become a tour guide (obviously a step up in the hierarchy). I asked to have a quick look – the book contained descriptions of the major Angkor area temples (who commissioned the temple, what was this king like, when the temple was built, etc). The information was good but unfortunately the quality of the texts was very poor – they were written in broken English with many grammar errors and wrong spelling. I told our guy that he would be speaking very incorrect English if he memorized those sentences and that he should try to find a better book. Read more of this post

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